“People, Look East”

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“People, Look East” at Grace & St. Peter’s, Hamden, CT. The pageant was presented on the Sunday after Christmas after having been snowed out on Advent IV.

A new, revised, expanded edition of “Go, Tell It on the Mountain,” The Sunday Paper’s collection of Christmas pageants, will be available as soon as I can get all the necessary renewals of the copyright permissions for the lyrics and music of the carols that are included in the scripts. Meanwhile, at this writing, there are still 6 copies left of the previous edition, at $22.95.  (The new edition will cost $30.00.)

The book’s Pageant #3, “People, Look East,” is the one that became an annual tradition in the parish where I worked for nearly thirty years. After my retirement from that position, my family and I joined a different congregation, and (after waiting a decent interval to get to know the parish) we introduced “People, Look East” there, and the good folks of this congregation have totally taken it into their hearts. In revising, updating and expanding my collection of pageant scripts, I am trying not to allow “People, Look East” to be The Tail That Wags the Dog, but it’s no secret that it’s the special one among the various scripts in the book. Here are some excerpts from the introductory notes to “People, Look East” in the forthcoming revised edition.

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Services of Lessons and Carols at Christmas date back to Victorian times, and have experienced a worldwide surge of popularity via the annual broadcasts of the Christmas Eve celebration at King’s College Chapel in England. In the Episcopal Church in the US, the Book of Occasional Services provides two outlines for lessons and carols—one for Christmas and one for Advent—which have had wide and increasing use on the parish level, often in combination with the Eucharist.

Continue reading ““People, Look East””

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PHARAOH’S DAUGHTER

Moses in the Bulrushes

As a White woman working in urban mission with children of color from 1994 to 2008, with a volunteer staff consisting overwhelmingly of White women, I struggled for images of liberation and leadership that fit our experience. The archetypal Bible story of liberation from oppression is, of course, the Exodus. But White people of privilege cannot be Moses to the children we work with: we do not come from their own community, and we cannot wish or will that difference away. As I wrestled with the scriptural story, I found an archetype that powerfully spoke to me, in the person of Pharaoh’s daughter.

Many times during the years I was Children’s Missioner at our downtown parish, I found myself telling her story, and last night, at the Faith Study Group I now lead in a different parish, I found myself telling it again, in light of the urgent concern over racial polarization that now grips our nation. It’s a troubling and deeply ambiguous story; because Pharaoh’s daughter was one of the oppressors, but moved with pity for baby Moses, she brought him into her own privileged world. And instead of being grateful, he ran away, and then he and his God came back and wreaked terrible vengeance on the oppressors.

Is there another way? Can we break the endless cycle of oppression and revenge? Can we help in a way that leads to reconciliation, and not to more domination and resentment? Can we find the humility to serve as Jesus does, with no agenda at all, except to honor what is in each of God’s children?

PHARAOH’S DAUGHTER

Once upon a time, there was a princess.

She was the daughter of a king—a great and terrible king, who ruled over the mighty kingdom of Egypt—and his name was Pharaoh.

And Pharaoh king of Egypt went up and down throughout his kingdom, to see if all was well in the land, and the people orderly and obedient.

And in the kingdom of Egypt, in the land of Goshen, there lived a people who were different from the Egyptians: the people of the Hebrews. For many years they had lived in the land of Goshen, and now they had become very numerous, and filled the land of Goshen. Continue reading “PHARAOH’S DAUGHTER”

NUGGETS

… on the ministry of faith formation with children

THE SUNDAY PAPERs Editorial for the Fall 1 season

The Sunday Paper’s Editorial Page began, decades ago, as a hand-typed paper document, photocopied and enclosed with the paper copies of The Sunday Paper and/or The Sunday Paper Junior issues sent out seasonally by mail. When we added electronic distribution of our Sunday issues, as .pdf files sent seasonally by email, the Editorial Page also transformed into that format, except for the small minority of subscribers who have chosen to continue getting their materials by mail.

Last spring I announced that the document format of the Editorial Page would be retired, and replaced by a blog and Facebook, to foster dialogue and to link up with the many conversations going on digitally among church educators, parents, clergy and others. For the time being at least, subscribers will continue to receive the Editorial in document format, by email or as hard copy. But in recognition of the ways we now communicate and share ideas, Editorials will also be posted here, for subscribers and non-subscribers alike. In recognition of this new level of interactivity and connection, this initial blog post is a miscellany of teasers and starters, gleaned from some of the most fruitful online sources for thoughts about faith formation.

Rebecca Nye on children’s spirituality

A first hallmark [of children’s spirituality] is its tendency to be hidden, or between the lines. … It’s often about a kind of deep knowing which is not rational, visible, measurable or even explicable – the exact opposite of the education system’s values that have such a shaped impact on their lives. And yet, when felt, it can be full of meaning, powerful and intensely real. … For example, in response to many Bible stories, children will often draw or play out their favourite superhero’s battle with some kind of baddie or monster, often to the dismay of the adults who assume that ‘nothing has gone in today’, especially compared to the child who dutifully reproduces a nice picture of the actual Bible story.

Continue reading “NUGGETS”

Greetings!

Welcome to THE SUNDAY PAPER’s blog.  This will be the venue for longish posts about Christian formation, liturgy, theology, children’s spirituality, and other topics that are related to the above in my head, if not in everybody’s.  THE SUNDAY PAPER’s periodic Editorial Page will be posted here at the same time as it is transmitted to our subscribers.

For more about THE SUNDAY PAPER, please visit our web site, www.the-sunday-paper.com.  At the moment it is charmingly retro … but changes will be coming in due course!