Family Values

I’ll post the next Sunday Paper Editorial in a few days. In the mean time, like so many others, I feel called to respond to the “Nashville Statement.” Not because I have any profound disagreements with the many other gracious and thoughtful responses out there, but because I feel my peculiar take on these issues of scriptural interpretation and enculturation may, perhaps, add something to the conversation. 

This is a piece I wrote over ten years ago.  I have made only the most minimal revisions to it. The lead-in connects it with the issue of children’s ministries, which is always my first concern.

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Mark, Chapter 10, strikes to the heart of the “family values” debate that is tearing apart our civil society and our churches. Asked his opinion of divorce, Jesus reminds us of God’s design in creation: we are made male and female in the image of God. We are to form lifelong bonds of love. And in the next paragraph, Mark describes Jesus welcoming and blessing children.

In the patriarchal culture in which Jesus lived, divorce could be initiated only by the husband, and it left the wife without status, social protection, or economic support. This grave injustice toward women, Jesus points out, reflects “hardness of heart,” and deserves condemnation. In a different culture, the justice equation may compute differently. Most Christians in our culture now believe that there are circumstances where divorce, however sad, is better—more just—than remaining in an abusive relationship or one in which caring and trust have been violated or lost.

What of “God made them male and female”—the issue that now consumes so much ink, and so much time and energy? What would Jesus do? What would Jesus say?

Continue reading “Family Values”

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“O MAY THY SOLDIERS, FAITHFUL, TRUE AND BOLD”

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This essay begins with a rant against the clumsy, tin-eared redaction of beloved hymns. But I also want to ask, Why does this matter? And because our ministry is to children, what does it say about how we tell our story to children?

I’m an English major and a choral singer, so let’s get to the strictly aesthetic questions first.

“For All the Saints,” written in 1864 by Bishop William Walsham How, praises Christ for all those who have gone before us, confessing his name, and who now rest from their labors. Its second stanza sets the frame for the entire rest of this long hymn: the saints who are now at rest have served honorably in a long and fearsome battle against evil, in which Christ himself was their champion and protector.

Thou wast their rock, their fortress and their might,
Thou, Lord, their captain in the well-fought fight;
Thou in the darkness drear their one true light,
          Alleluia! Alleluia!

The stirring tune, “Sine Nomine” by Ralph Vaughan Williams, was written for Bishop How’s words. Vaughan Williams was a consummate hymn-tune writer, and his tune is tailored to this stanza above all others, and particularly to the crucial second line of the stanza. In melody as in words, that second line lingers lovingly on “Thou, Lord,” then picks up forward momentum to end with a robustly punctuated cadence—the vigorously percussive words, “well-fought fight” set to three falling blows down to the dominant tonality.

Here’s what one committee of hymn revisers has done with this stanza:

You were their rock, their refuge, and their might:
You, Christ, the hope that put their fears to flight;
’Mid gloom and doubt, you were their one true light.
          Alleluia! Alleluia! Continue reading ““O MAY THY SOLDIERS, FAITHFUL, TRUE AND BOLD””